The via combusta

Scorpio. Guido Bonatti, 'De Astronomia Libri X'. Basel. Nicolaus Pruknerus. (1550)
Scorpio. Guido Bonatti, ‘De Astronomia Libri X’. Basel. Nicolaus Pruknerus. (1550)

The via combusta is also known as the burned path or the fiery road, names that make the area sound grim. But where is it exactly? Although in the distant past there were a few different ideas on its exact location, accepted astrological tradition states  it to be a 30 degree stretch between 15 degrees libra and 15 degrees scorpio inclusive.

In antiquity libra was actually part of the constellation scorpio and Claudius Ptolemy refers to the constellation of libra as ‘the Claws of the Scorpion’(1). It has always been regarded as an ominous area of the chart throughout the ages. Ancient stargazers worried about any planet arriving at this point, symbolically caught in the scorpion’s claws. We will probably never know the reason for the malefic association with this stretch of the zodiac but the reputation of the via combusta persists.

In an electional chart it served as a warning, foretelling of difficulty or trouble ahead – not a good indiction to commence any venture. In a horary chart it served the same purpose and was an indication to defer judgement until the astrologer was better informed.

Libra marks the start of the Autumn Equinox when the sun’s power wanes but both lights are affected in the signs that contain the via combusta. The sun is in fall in libra, the moon in scorpio. This area is opposite their exaltation signs of aries and taurus.

Further uncongeniality is emphasised if we recall that libra is the exaltation of saturn and scorpio is the domicile of mars. The greater and lesser lights are overcome by the greater and lesser malefics. The power of the luminaries is weakened hence this area’s link with danger. Because the sun and moon represent one’s life force and soul respectively, anything that diminishes or obscures them should definitely be avoided.

1. Claudius Ptolemy. Tetrabiblos. Book 1. Chapter 9.

The planetary day

“Mashallah” Title page from the ‘De scientia motus orbis by Albrecht Dürer. (1504).

Most traditional astrologers are aware of the scheme of planetary days and accept them without another thought. At first glance there seems to be no real pattern to the allocation of certain planets to certain days. Like everything else handed down to us in traditional astrology, it’s worth spending a little bit of time investigating rather than simply accepting everything handed down to us from the tradition without question. If we don’t we will never understand the rationale behind it or how everything is linked.

When looking at the planetary days a pattern soon emerges, enabling  us to see how they correlate with the planets. It is apparent that Sect has played its part in the process.

Although there are two great lights in the sky, it is the sun that dictates sect. The sun rules over the day with its life giving rays. The moon on the other hand rules the night. It comes second to the sun for it has no intrinsic light of its own and reflects the sun’s light. It is dependant on the sun’s rays.

By honouring this fact and if we start the week with Sunday, we see that there are three days ruled by masculine planets and two days ruled by feminine planets. This gives us masculine and feminine days. There is one day of the week that is mixed.

Day 1. Sunday is ruled by the sun lying exactly at the centre of heaven.

Day 2. Monday is ruled by the moon lying exactly between earth and heaven.

Day 3. Tuesday is ruled by mars, the first planet above the sun.

Day 4. Wednesday is ruled by mercury, the first planet above moon.

Day 5. Thursday is ruled by jupiter, the second planet above the sun.

Day 6. Friday is ruled by venus, the second planet above moon.

Day 7. Saturday is ruled by saturn, the third planet above the sun.

  • The odd-numbered days belong to the sun and the diurnal sect planets.
  • The even-number days belong to the moon and the nocturnal sect planets.
  • The exception to this rule is mercury, partaking of both natures, it rules the mid-week day of Wednesday.